Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2011

The studio time for the “Paid” EP was $6000. A copy of the receipt is included in the CD packaging. Additional costs included manufacturing, mastering, art, advertising, radio, press, etc…

The EP was recorded at Robert Lang Studios, which was a departure from their frequent recording spot, Studio Litho. Also Tim Gabor did not do the cover art – something he usually did. Of the 6 Tracks, only three were new, and two were Supersuckers classics revisited. In keeping with the bands spirit, it was released on 06/06/06. Fan club members were even treated to an advance copy in the mail.

Eddie Spaghetti described the method of the EP release below, when asked in a German on-line interview below found at dewahrschauer.net  –

“Paid” is the first of two or three EP’s which will be part of an upcoming full-length album. what was so interesting for you to choose this way of releasing like they did in the Fifties A – I just think that with the way people get their music now, it’s a chance for us to re-think the way we deliver it. And the fact of the matter is that it’s a singles-driven world out there today and instead of being down about that, we’ve decided to embrace it to an extent. If were entirely up to me, we’d just put out singles from now on, but alas, we’re a band and we do things together, so the EP was a bit of a compromise to that regard. That said, It’s an awesome record!

I was recently asked about the idea of releasing this EP… And I’m sure the above sums it up well. Regardless, I thought the EP was a good call and maybe even a bit ahead of it’s time. I liked the idea of the band releasing songs when they had them finished and not sitting on them. And these were quality tunes. Furthermore, we really believed radio would embrace it because of its “crossover” appeal. Capturing new fans with songs like “Breaking Honey’s Heart” and “Paid” seemed inevitable. And of course I felt great when the TV show, “Deadliest Catch”, chose to use “Paid”. But overall, my expectations fell short. It wasn’t a huge seller and radio didn’t pay much attention. In fact, some of the hardcore fans felt it was just too soft and some wondered why the band decided to mix both “rock” and “country” songs on the same release. It was well received by the press and fans, however it didn’t catapult the band out of the bars and into the theaters as hoped. Proving once again, the bands legendary live shows, were going to have to be the catalyst for the leap into larger venues.

Looking back, “Paid” marked a huge turning point for the band. The days of the successful Big Show and banner year of 2005 were over. While we all looked forward to 2006, believing all our past efforts would make things better, the glory days seemed to be fading. Even with the addition of Scott Churilla, and a long anticipated full length album ( later to be titled, Get It Together) planned in the near future, there was change in the air.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »